ECOBOND – SOIL STABILIZATION AND EROSION CONTROL

SOIL STABILIZATION

The process of soil stabilization refers to changing the physical properties of soil in order to improve its strength, durability, or other qualities.  Typically, this is important for road construction, and other concerns related to the building and maintenance of infrastructure.  Soil that has been stabilized will have a vastly improved weight bearing capability, and will also be significantly more resistant to being damaged by water, frost, or inclement conditions.

ECOBOND is a low viscosity chemical, reactive gel or bio enzyme available as a liquid. Having almost the same viscosity as water, ECOBOND can permeate anywhere water can travel and cures within a controllable time frame anywhere from 5 seconds to ±10 hours or even days if slow curing is necessary. Once it cures, it creates an effective, long-lasting water barrier while providing superb soil stabilization. It will control ground water and stabilize soil permanently.

ECOBOND is available in forms of bio-enzyme, polymer reactive gel and chemical type. All three have their own advantages for the varying typical soils types

ECOBOND is a low viscosity chemical, reactive gel or bio enzyme available as a liquid. Having almost the same viscosity as water, ECOBOND can permeate anywhere water can travel and cures within a controllable time frame anywhere from 5 seconds to ±10 hours or even days if slow curing is necessary. Once it cures, it creates an effective, long-lasting water barrier while providing superb soil stabilization. It will control ground water and stabilize soil permanently.

ECOBOND is available in forms of bio-enzyme, polymer reactive gel and chemical type. All three have their own advantages in certain typical soils types.

TYPICAL GRADES

  • ECOBOND E (Enzyme based)
  • ECOBOND P (Polymer based)
  • ECOBOND G (Chemical gel based)

APPLICATION OF ECOBOND

  • Stops water infiltration into manholes, sanitary and storm sewer mainlines, joints, laterals, tunnels, mines, and various other geotechnical applications and underground structures by stabilizing external substrate

 

  • Ground modification/slope stability for prevention of landslides, erosion, or any place where site conditions or project requirements dictate modification of the existing soil properties

COMMONLY USED GROUTING TECHNIQUE

Permeation grouting is a general term for grouting that is carried out to fill pervasive void space inherent to the formation of the material being grouted. Generally, this type of grouting is done within soil, however, also may be applied to consolidated materials, such as poorly cemented sedimentary formations.

The intent of the grouting is to fill void space (primarily intergranular) within the medium being grouted. Grouting may be done either to improve the soil structure or to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the soil or rock. Grouting to improve soil structure is often done prior to excavations to act as support of excavation, improve stand up time, or reduce settlement. Soil structure may also be improved to increase bearing capacity. Hydraulic conductivity applications may be undertaken any time a reduction in gas or liquid inflow or migration is required. Permeation grouting is generally carried out in defined zones utilizing sleeve ports (also known as tube-a-manchettes) installed into soil or isolated intervals within rock. This method allows the grout to be injected at a specified location.

Permeation grouting is commonly utilized for the following applications:

  • Pre-excavation grouting for excavations in soil or poorly cemented sedimentary rock
  • To improve excavation conditions at portals, shallow shafts, or along alignments
  • Support of Excavation
  • Ground Modification

TECHNOKOTES has performed permeation grouting on numerous projects in many varying geologies. Typical projects include pre-excavation grout for water cut-off within shafts and slopes, ground improvement for portals, and water cut-off/support of excavation for coffer structures.TECHNOKOTES has the ability to place numerous grout types as well as build or modify grouting equipment to suit the job conditions.

Permeation grouting programs may be carried out utilizing both cementitious and chemical grouts.

Benefits

  • Effective and safe methods of direct underpinning of structures and utilities
  • Can double as earth retention/excavation support system
  • Suitable for open or restricted access
  • Targeted treatment of specific depth intervals possible
  • No harmful vibrations imparted to surrounding structures
  • Permeation grouting produces no appreciable waste

Typical Uses

  • Restricted access construction, inside and outside
  • Grouting around in situ obstructions
  • Underpinning structures adjacent to excavations
  • Enhance or complete other retentions systems where utilities interfere with their installation.

SOIL PERMEATION GROUTING METHOD

Soil Permeation Grouting is typically used to reduce soil permeability, improve soil cohesion, improve the structural characteristics of the soil, or, as often the case, a combination of some or all of these goals. It involves the injection of grout at low pressures into the soil matrix in an effort to permeate or encapsulate the individual soil grains without otherwise disturbing the natural state of the soil.

Sleeve pipes are the key enabling apparatus involved. They are installed prior to grouting by being placed and encapsulated in a weak mix of bentonite and cement in a series of drilled holes intersecting the target soil mass. A sleeve pipe, typically 38 mm to 75 mm diameter PVC or steel pipe, contains several sets of small holes along its length that are enveloped by protective, expandable, rubber sleeves. The sleeves act as one-way valves, keeping fluids outside the pipe from getting in, but allowing fluid on the inside – once sufficiently pressurized – to get out. A device called a packer is used to isolate one or more sleeves at a time. Grout is injected via the grout pump at surface, through the grout tube to the packer, then finally across the sleeve and into the interstitial space between the individual soil grains.

Grout is injected into the soil slowly and under relatively low pressure in order to avoid excessive hydrofracturing of the soil. Grout spread is governed by soil type, degree of soil compaction, grain size distribution, grout type (eg. solution or suspension), gel time, grout rheology and grouting pressure. Real time monitoring of pressure, flow and cumulative grout take is used to constantly evaluate and determine the direction of the grouting program. Its implementation also conveniently results in measurement of the completed work for compilation of records and computation of useful data such as theoretical grout spread and determination of the hydrofracturing threshold.

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